Fighting Tigers:
Codex <> Tactics <> Gallery <> Allies and Enemies <> Tales of the Tigers

Other Pages:
Main <> What's New <> Site Index <> The Tiger Roars <> Themed Army Ideas
Events and Battle Reports <> Campaigns <> Terrain <> FAQ <> Beyond the Jungle

Themed Army Ideas
From Idea to Reality: The Dusk Raiders
 Part 1 <> Part 2

From Idea to Reality: The Dusk Raiders (Part 2)  by Patrick Eibel 

The list I originally created was based on the models I had with no changes to weapons and few new models.  I knew I wanted to continue to keep things simple, as I already have more than enough models to paint in my other armies.  That being said, it was time to take a critical eye to the army to see how I could make it truly fearsome (no snickering, you Chaos Codex haters.)  I had to really think about how to get the most out of each unit and what I would need to add. 

 

Let’s start by discussing the Cultists.  Cultists are a great, cheap Troop choice, and the new models are pretty spiffy.  I had 20 Cultists that I had previously gotten on eBay, and decided to add 8 more for two squads of 14 (though GW has done away with the “sacred number” idea for each Ruinous Power, I decided to keep my units in multiples of 7, the number of Nurgle). 

Conveniently, I was able to get more autogun-wielding Cultists to add to the four I already had, so I had two visually distinct units (the other unit has close combat weapons.) 

 

I had three choices on how to field the Cultists, and which choice I took would drive the rest of the army build.  First, I could leave them “as-is” – close combat dudes with a flamer, autogun dudes with a heavy stubber.  This would be relatively cheap on points, but would not make the Cultists much of a threat.  Second, I could give each Cult mob Marks of Nurgle, raising their Toughness to 4, but with and Armor Save of 6, this would not have any great effect over the first option.  Finally, since I was going with Nurgle, I could make them Plague Zombies. 



Dusk Raider Plague Marines and Cultists face off against Fighting Tigers of Veda in the first battle of the King of the Hill campaign

 

To make Cultists Plague Zombies, you need to take Typhus.  For the significant investment in points, each Cultist unit gets Fearless and Feel No Pain, but becomes Slow And Purposeful.  I liked the idea of Fearless and Feel No Pain and using the Cultists as objective holders.  Now at this point, some would suggest I should have picked up some zombie models, since the Cultists’ weapons would be negated by becoming zombies.  Child, please.  I already invested in these models, I am not going to replace them.

 

I now had an HQ (Typhus) and two Troops (two units of 14 Plague Zombies each).  Another benefit of Typhus is that he makes Plague Marines a Troop selection.  Plague Marines also are Fearless and have Feel No Pain.  This seemed like a no-brainer, so I added two units of 7, each with two plasma guns.  A couple of weeks scouring eBay, and I was able to pick up all metal miniatures (screw you Finecast) at not too steep a price.

 

The pieces were really starting to fall into place.  Now, I just need to finish fleshing out the army.  Much Internet wisdom suggests using Nurgle Bike units to get speedy Toughness 6 bad guys.  I chose not to go that route, as I already had my Fast Attack slots full (Heldrake, Raptors, Spawn) and I really needed to address taking out heavy armor. 

 

I could have repeated the Havocs from the original list, but actually fielding lots of missile launchers can get expensive (damn you, GW, for making kits without multiples of all the options), and I did not want to permanently “borrow” the Long Fangs.  I decided to get really Nurgly and go with Obliterators with Marks of Nurgle.  The only issue would be finding alternative models, because the current GW Oblits are just hideous. 

 

New and Improved Nurgleness

After retooling the regular Marine figures I had used for the original list, I felt I had put together a really nasty foce.  Here is what 2,000 points yield:

 

  • Typhus
  • 7 Plague Marines w/ two plasma guns, Champion w/ plasma pistol
  • 7 Plague Marines w/ two plasma guns, Champion w/ plasma pistol
  • 7 Chaos Space Marines w/ flamer
  • 14 Plague Zombies
  • 14 Plague Zombies
  • 7 Chosen w/ four plasma guns
  • 14 Raptors w/ two meltaguns, Champion w/ plasma pistol
  • Heldrake w/ baleflamer
  • 2 Chaos Spawn w/ Mark of Nurgle
  • 7 Havocs w/ 4 autocannons
  • 2 Obliterators w/Mark of Nurgle
  • 2 Obliterators w/ Mark of Nurgle

 

The Daemon Prince and Sorcerer from the original list would be added if I want to bump up to 2,500 points, or to be swapped in for variety. I considered versions of the list with all the Marine units getting Marks of Nurgle, but opted to get more bodies on the field instead.

 

Creating a Backstory

Creating an army that relates to already existing background material can be easier and yet more difficult that starting from scratch.  It is easier in that many of the names, places and story have already been created for you.  It is more difficult in that, if your army doesn’t fit perfectly into that story you will have some ‘splaining to do.

 

My working story for this army is that a Dusk Raider Apothecary, the lone survivor of his unit, sought refuge on an obscure planet outside Imperium-controlled space.  He was wounded and needed to spend some time healing, so he holed up in some remote caves.  His only companions were some bats that laired in the deep recesses of the caves.  If you have ever seen the movie Contagion, you know that bats and bat guano can carry disease.  In this case, the Space Marine’s body would neutralize any toxic properties, but constant exposure to spores while in his weakened state caused him to hallucinate.  Visions of the “Great Bat” (Nurgle) began appearing to him and encouraging him to survive and begin anew. 

 

Over time, the Apothecary healed, but still suffered from the visions.  He was discovered by the local populace, who revered him like a god because of his enhanced stature and ability.  He recruited true believers to his cause, and over a long period of time, began to collect geneseed and armor by embedding his followers into the ranks of the Administratum.  As genetic material and equipment became available, the Apothecary created new Marines and issued them Dusk Raider armor that has been repainted from whatever army it was scavenged from.  After many, many years he created a small, loyal force, all tainted by the same madness that had infected him.  The Apothecary himself has gone entirely over to the Great Bat/Nurgle and becomes his herald (a proxied Typhus).

           



Heldrake and proxied Chaos Spawn


From Idea to Reality: The Dusk Raiders
Part 1 <> Part 2



Posted March 2014.
 

Top

Fighting Tigers:
Codex <> Tactics <> Gallery <> Allies and Enemies <> Tales of the Tigers

Other Pages:
Main <> What's New <> Site Index <> The Tiger Roars <> Themed Army Ideas
Events and Battle Reports <> Campaigns <> Terrain <> FAQ <> Beyond the Jungle