Codex: Space Marines—Wait, Haven’t We Done This Before?

by Kenton Kilgore

The latest (but certainly not last) version of Codex: Space Marines is here, the previous one having arrived only two years ago, with the advent of 8th Edition.  As I’m a SM player since 1987, I thought I’d take a look and share my thoughts on the new book with you.

I won’t go over everything (at almost 200 pages, it’s 4 times larger than the 3rd Edition version issued in 1998), just the stuff that jumped out me.  Sound good?  Let’s do this!

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Battles with the Becker Boys, Part 1

For almost 20 years, my family and I have been good friends with our neighbors across the street, the Becker’s.  Our kids are close in age, and have grown up together like siblings.  The two “Becker Boys”—Nathan (19) and Dylan (18)—are ardent video gamers, but haven’t been interested in 40K, despite knowing for years that I play.

“Haven’t been interested,” that is, until Nate went off to college, found some friends who are into it, and came back home raving to his little brother about how cool it is.  So, this summer, I taught them the rules, gave them tips on collecting and painting, and helped them acquire their very own armies.

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Doctors’ Duel

by Kenton Kilgore and Patrick Eibel

It’s been much too long since we did a battle report here at the Jungle, so let’s remedy that appalling situation.  As we did previously, we’re presenting our report in narrative style, but so everyone understands what’s going on, we will, when necessary, note or explain something in game terms by putting it in [brackets] as an aside to the actual tale.

Sound good? Let’s get to it, then! Please to follow us over here, and mind your step….

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Armies of the Jungle: Kabal of the Ozone Scorpions

In this series, we showcase armies used by your humble Jungle Guides.  By detailing how the army was collected, how the background and color schemes were developed, and how the army is used on the battlefield, we hope that this series will provide inspiration for those interested in collecting similar armies.

“I was promised a thousand and one yellow daffodils—and yet, there are none,” Archon Syryx Lynatharr said.  He turned to Dr. Jheste, his advisor.  “Why is that?”

“As you can see, Your Magnificence,” the Haemonculus replied, extending an arm, “the city is on fire.”

Indeed, everywhere, the towering, barbed spires of Commorragh were engulfed in flames, both natural—yellow, orange, and red—and supernatural—purple, blue, green.  From high above, an explosion, and the screams of the burning and dying, and the barking laughter of daemons. 

Clutching their splinter rifles a bit tighter, a few of the silver-helmeted Kabalite Warriors guarding Lynatharr and Jheste nervously glanced up, even as thousands of their comrades scrambled through the rippling, gaping tear in reality that was allowing them to return, at last, to the Dark City.

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Bringing Back the Bad Guys, Part 2: Drukhari

by Kenton Kilgore

Time for a long-overdue look at the latest codex for one of my favorite armies, the Dark Eldar….errr, Dark Aeldari….errrr, the “Drukhari.”  I’ve been collecting them ever since the 3rd Edition boxed set came out more than 20 years ago (!), and I’m pleased to see them going strong.  So, if you haven’t already explored the Book of the Death Twinkies, let’s see what they have going for them.

I won’t discuss everything in the new codex, only stuff that jumped out at me and went “Boo!”  Mostly, I’ll be comparing the codex with the Index version that came out at the beginning of 8th (has it really been almost two years?), but sometimes I’ll mention codices from previous editions.  I’ll talk about what I like, what I dislike, and what I’m ambivalent about.  Off we go!

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Less is More

a guest article by Gareth Topping

IT’S ALL TOO EASY to have too much of a good thing, and that certainly rings true for Warhammer 40,000.  Oh sure, it’s all well and good to propose a six-player, 10,000 point mega-battle with more tanks and Titans on the table than infantry, but as with most things the reality sadly doesn’t live up to the fantasy.

This is mostly because 40k tends to collapse under its own weight at games of 2,000 points or more (or 100 Power, if you’re a casual scrub like me who uses Power Ratings, aka one of the better things that 8th Edition introduced), simply because the rules aren’t optimised to work at that sort of size.  I’ve always held the opinion that things like super-heavy tanks, Knights (and their filthy xenos equivalents like Stompas and Riptides), and flyers basically don’t belong in normal-scale 40k.

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Silence in the Jungle

IFFN YOU’RE WONDERING, Faithful Jungle Fanboy or Fangirl, why it has been over two months since I last updated this site, it has not been for want of enthusiasm, or that something horrible has happened to me or my loved ones, or anything of the sort.  Rather, it has been because I have been working very hard on this:

This Wasted Land will be my third published novel (after Dragontamer’s Daughters and Lost Dogs), a young adult dark fantasy work that I currently plan to release through Amazon on October 15 of this year.  What’s it about?

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Armies of the Jungle: Yblis’ Centurions

In this series, we showcase armies used by your humble Jungle Guides.  By detailing how the army was collected, how the background and color schemes were developed, and how the army is used on the battlefield, we hope that this series will provide inspiration for those interested in collecting similar armies.

Battle, endless battle, on a thousand, thousand worlds, for a thousand, thousand years.  Millions fought, millions died—were they memories, or dreams?  The general had slept for so long that he no longer knew. 

At this moment, he recalled—imagined?—with exacting detail how he and his soldiers had blasted through the Syryllian’s lines, gunning down the gelatinous amphibians as they ran.  He remembered— dreamed?— how the loathsome, pulsating body of the Syryllian DeoRex had literally evaporated under the repeated blows of his powerstaff.  Even now, so many years later, the general felt a surge of joy and pride in his victory, just one of a thousand, thousand.

Suddenly, the general was roused to consciousness by a rich, sonorous voice, one he knew and loved. “Awaken, sweet slave,” the voice said.

The general looked about.  Light—a burning white light—had come to the sealed chamber where he had stood, immobile and inert, for so long.

“It is good to see you again,” the voice said, as the light dimmed and coalesced into a shadowy, robed figure who sat in a throne atop a dais at the end of the chamber. 

The general raised his powerstaff and took two steps forward.  “Remove yourself from the throne of my master,” he growled, his voice little more than a harsh buzzing. 

“You remember the ancient traditions.  Good.  Indeed, I am your master.”

“Crystalord is my master,” the generalk replied.  “You are not him.”

“But I am,” the figure said.  It stood, and a golden aura flared around it as it transformed into a faceless humanoid made of dazzling, transparent crystal facets.  “This is the form I took when you first swore allegiance to me, and Crystalord was the name I used then.”

“As you command,” the general said, laying down his staff and kowtowing on the stone floor. 

“Rise, my slave,” the figure said. “Many names I have used, and many guises have I worn.  Some call me the Jackal God.  Others call me the Deceiver.  Right here and now, I call myself Yblis.”  The crystal figure morphed into the dim robed figure.  “Now, attend,” it said.

An image appeared in the air nearby.  A Space Marine in tiger-striped armor fought hand-to-hand with a skeletal figure shod in bronze.  “I need a new commander for one of my armies.  Lord Thoth failed me in a crucial battle, and destruction has been his just reward,” Yblis said.  The image vanished.

“Much time has passed since you served me last, yet I have not forgotten your skill or devotion.  I wish you to take Thoth’s place.  You will do that for me, won’t you?”

The general held out his hand above his staff, which still lay on the floor. The staff flickered, vanished, then re-appeared in his grasp.  “Yblis is my master,” he said. 

“Excellent,” the figure replied.  “The name you used when last you served me has been forgotten, even by me,” it chuckled.  “In addition to granting you new powers and new warriors, I shall also grant you a new form and a new name.  Overlord Lucifer I shall call you, the Bearer of Light—my light.” 

Lucifer felt no pain, of course, as Yblis raised his hand and a burst of light sprang from it, temporarily overwhelming his photoreceptors.  When they resumed transmitting images, he was mildly surprised to find himself simultaneously viewing Yblis from two different vantage points, each a few feet from the other. 

He turned and saw himself: one version stood and held his ancient powerstaff; the other wielded a different staff and floated in the air atop the body of a Destroyer.  Lucifer thought to reach out, and both versions moved their arms forward.  He thought to look back at his master and both heads swiveled.  Though he was still of one mind, he now had two bodies to carry out Yblis’ will. 

“There is a new force in the universe,” Yblis said.  “It calls itself ‘Man.’ I want it destroyed.  Exterminated.  You will do that for me, won’t you?” 

“As you command,” both Lucifers replied. 

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Bringing Back the Bad Guys, Part 1: Necrons

by Kenton Kilgore

When the 8e Indexes dropped, I had decided that I wasn’t going to purchase the new codices, because I didn’t expect the latter to be much different from the former, and because I don’t play that often.  But I am glad I bought Book of the ‘Bots Version 8, because it’s worth it.  How so?  Let me show you.

I’m not going to review every bit of Codex: Necrons, because that would easily become wearisome, but I’ll touch on things I liked, things I didn’t, and things that I was on the fence about.  Cool by you?  Then let’s do this.

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A New Site, A New Game, A New Army

by Kenton Kilgore and Patrick Eibel

Welcome to the first battle report of the new (and hopefully improved) Jungle.  Pat and I played this, our first game using the 8th Edition rules, a while back, but Real Life™ has kept us from chronicling it until now.

Jungle visitors told us that they really enjoyed the storytelling aspect of our latest campaign, The Ongoing Narrative of War (Pat and I thought it was a lot of fun, too), so from now on, that’s the style in which we’ll do all our batreps.  To make sure everyone has a good understanding of what’s happening during the dramatization of the action, we will, when necessary, note or explain something in game terms by putting it in [brackets] so that you’ll know it’s an aside, and not part of the actual tale.

So, let’s get it—and this new site—started!

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